Innovation on iconic vessels

Mini Magnum 747 foils SEAir

The SEAir Mini 747

The 6,50m long monohull, object of all our attentions, will soon fly with SEAir's multidirectional foil system. Pushing foils further to by flying across the Atlantic Ocean will soon be a reality.

The ground-breaking Magnum 747 prototype, designed and built by David Raison, was transformed into a flight demonstrator. It has been equipped with a portside foil with eight sensors and a control unit allowing to manoeuvre the foil. Trials during the first trimester of 2017 will allow in depth testing of different offshore take-off and flight stabilisation settings. SEAir will then work on modifying the systems and the settings to allow the most durable flight solutions possible. Creating power is no longer a problem, but making use of it is far more complex. Starboard will also be equipped with an even more advanced foil, with electronic controls.

The Moth

The small yet demanding 3,50m monohull is the perfect support to develop racing foils and next generation manufacturing techniques. SEAir is specialised in the enhancement of these flying boats.

SEAir's two Moths are instrumented to help us understand how foils behave and then model flight. SEAir works on probing systems allowing to mechanically control the foil winglets, to maintain optimal flight height. It's also on Moths that SEAir developed and patented a new manufacturing process of small foils.

There are still many development and evolution prospects with boats where almost all innovations are possible. To make this happen, SEAir has created a sporting team in association with the École Nationale de Voile et des Sports Nautiques (ENVSN) in Quiberon and the Classe Française. In 2016, the Moth SEAir team shined during several races, and SEAir equipment won the first edition of the Brittany Moth Series.

Multihulls

A flight system designed for small sporting catamarans, as well as for larger vessels, will soon be available. Two versions of catamarans will be equipped with SEAir foils shortly, and a larger sporting trimaran project is currently in the final stages.